Breaking Waves: Ocean News

08/16/2019 - 08:30
Endangered bonobo, migrating storks and one of the world’s biggest raptors Continue reading...
08/16/2019 - 06:53
Electric bin lorries and solar-powered charging points are aimed at making city cleanest in UK “They’re marvellous. I just love them.” After nearly 26 years driving a diesel-powered taxi around the streets of Dundee, James Leaburn has switched to an all-electric car, in the bold yellow livery of a classic New York cab. “They’re quiet, comfortable and the kids just love it because it’s like a New York cab,” said Leaburn as he plugged in at a council-run charging hub. “There’s no servicing, no broken fanbelts, no oil to change and no flat batteries. Just the press of a button and they’re away.” Continue reading...
08/16/2019 - 06:08
International concerns grow over deforestation surge since Jair Bolsonaro took power Norway has followed Germany in suspending donations to the Brazilian government’s Amazon Fund after a surge in deforestation in the South American rainforest. The move has triggered a caustic attack from the country’s rightwing president. Related: Bolsonaro rejects 'Captain Chainsaw' label as data shows deforestation 'exploded' Continue reading...
08/16/2019 - 03:24
Exclusive: Michael McCormack says island nations want Australia to shut down industry ‘so they can survive’ Pacific island nations affected by the climate crisis will continue to survive “because many of their workers come here to pick our fruit”, Australia’s deputy prime minister has said. Michael McCormack’s comments were made after critical talks at the Pacific Islands Forum that almost collapsed over Australia’s positions on coal and climate change. Continue reading...
08/16/2019 - 02:00
Compostable bowls are considered eco-friendly, but they are covered in chemicals that persist indefinitely and are linked to troubling health effects For years, disposable bowls have been a stalwart ally of the fast-casual restaurant. Beige, earthy-looking and made from molded plant fibers, these receptacles appear less wasteful than single-use plastic, lending an aura of social responsibility to the eateries that use them. Some varieties are even certified compostable, which means they’re guaranteed to break down in commercial composting facilities, if not the backyard leaf pile. And while only a few chains actually run composting programs, these bowls still feel lighter-touch somehow – even when they’re simply shipped to the landfill. They suggest a higher-minded way of eating, one based on a form of packaging that’s almost as ephemeral as our encounters with it. But fast-casual bowls have a troubling secret: virtually all of them contain worrisome chemicals that never biodegrade, polluting soil, water and our bodies in the process. The truth is that, though you might only handle your salad bowl for five minutes, traces of it will stick around in the environment for ever. Continue reading...
08/16/2019 - 01:25
Australia’s regional and global influence will not grow unless we are fair dinkum about acting on climate change As the Pacific Islands Forum comes to an end, Australia has yet again been shamed on a global stage for our inaction on climate change. The forum was held in Tuvalu, one of the lowest lying islands on Earth, where the effects of sea level rise are already being seen. For Tuvalu, a global commitment to limiting climate change to 1.5C is literally a question of survival. By doing everything he could to water down the forum communique’s climate language, the Australian prime minister, Scott Morrison, refused to listen to the words of Tuvalu’s prime minister, Enele Sopoaga, when he urged leaders to focus on “survival, not saving the economies of countries”. Continue reading...
08/16/2019 - 01:00
As UK rents rise and online retailers eat into their margins, shops struggle to survive In the early 1930s a young William Laker would cycle the 50-odd miles from his home in Kent to Crystal Palace in south London to visit the woman who would, half a century later, become my grandmother. There is every chance Grandpa would have popped into the small bike shop at 3&5 Central Hill in Crystal Palace. That very shop remained open for about 97 years, serving generations of cyclists, but in July the current custodian of what is now called Blue Door Bicycles, David Hibbs, announced it is to close its door for good. Continue reading...
08/16/2019 - 00:00
Recent mass shootings have been linked to ‘eco-xenophobia’ – part of a tradition that dates to America’s first conservationists The environmentalist, white nationalist, and influential anti-immigration activist John Tanton died less than three weeks before the El Paso shooting. Tanton lived to see his movement shape much of modern US immigration policy, but not this latest violent turn. A hate-filled document allegedly linked to the man suspected of killing 22 people in El Paso on 3 August echoed the kind of rhetoric generally favored by the far right – and also had a decidedly environmentalist, Tanton-like bent. The document praised the Dr Seuss character the Lorax, who says he speaks for the trees, and complained about the unsustainable overuse of paper towels. It concluded that the best course of environmental action would be mass murder. Continue reading...
08/15/2019 - 20:13
Australia’s prime minister Scott Morrison came under fire from Tuvalu’s leader Enele Sopoaga Critical talks at the Pacific Islands Forum almost collapsed twice amid “fierce” clashes between the Australian prime minister, Scott Morrison, and Tuvalu’s prime minister, Enele Sopoaga, over Australia’s “red lines” on climate change. Ralph Regenvanu, Vanuatu’s foreign minister, who was part of the drafting committee of the forum communique and observed the leaders’ retreat, said there was heated discussion over the Australian delegation’s insistence on the removal of references to coal, setting a target of limiting global warming to below 1.5C and announcing a strategy for zero emissions by 2050. Continue reading...
08/15/2019 - 17:53
The poison-filled traps are used by the federal government to kill coyotes, foxes and other animals for farmers and ranchers After sustained public outcry, the Trump administration has voided its decision to reauthorize controversial cyanide traps for killing wildlife. The traps, which are known as M-44s and dubbed “cyanide bombs” by critics, are spring-loaded devices that emit a spray of sodium cyanide to kill their targets. The traps are most frequently used by Wildlife Services, a little-known federal agency inside the United States Department of Agriculture, to kill coyotes, foxes and other animals at the behest of private agriculture operators. Continue reading...