Breaking Waves: Ocean News

12/06/2021 - 11:13
Ted Hughes felt the soon-to-be minister for economy and climate was ‘on the same wavelength’ The man who will spend the next four years trying to bring about a green transformation of Germany’s coal-hungry industry once faced another daunting challenge in a previous, less publicly exposed career: translating the most controversial poems in recent British history from English into German. As Germany’s next vice-chancellor and minister for economy and climate, Green party co-leader Robert Habeck will be one of the most powerful politicians not just in Germany but Europe, overseeing a new super-ministry that will span general economic policy, renewable energy and the expansion of the country’s electricity grid, with a mooted budget upwards of €10bn. Continue reading...
12/06/2021 - 11:00
Reefs from Seychelles to South Africa may become functionally extinct due to global heating and overfishing, study finds All coral reefs in the western Indian Ocean are at high risk of collapse in the next 50 years due to global heating and overfishing, according to a new assessment. From Seychelles to the Delagoa region off the coast of Mozambique and South Africa, the reef systems are at risk of becoming functionally extinct by the 2070s, with a huge loss of biodiversity, and threatening the livelihoods and food sources for hundreds of thousands of people. Continue reading...
12/06/2021 - 07:00
Exclusive: Consortium of energy firms and universities says underground storage of hydrogen can also be investigated Exhausted oil and gas wells would be turned into the UK’s first deep test sites for burying carbon dioxide next year, under plans from a consortium of universities and energy companies. There are hundreds of active onshore oil and gas wells in the UK. But as they come to the end of their lives, some need to be redeployed for trials of pumping CO2 underground and monitoring it to ensure it does not escape, the group says. The test wells could also be used to assess how hydrogen can be stored underground. Continue reading...
12/06/2021 - 02:00
I can’t have Octopus Energy’s Go tariff because the meter would interfere with air force systems A few months ago I decided to switch energy supplier and moved to Octopus Energy’s Go tariff, principally because it offers cheap electric car charging overnight at a rate of 5p/kWh. I applied to have the required smart meter installed. But after being given a date, I was later declined on the basis that smart meters cannot work at my address because they interfere with the missile early warning system at RAF Fylingdales. Continue reading...
12/06/2021 - 01:01
Chris Bowen says party’s stance is not negotiable as Morrison claims a vote for Labor is a vote for ‘Greens targets’ Download the free Guardian app; get our morning email briefing The Australian opposition has attempted to blunt a Coalition scare campaign by ruling out negotiating a stronger emissions reduction target if next year’s election results in a hung parliament. The senior Labor frontbencher Chris Bowen said his party had “paid a big price” in the “climate wars” over the past decade, and a central task of an incoming Albanese government would be to end the “destructive” politics on the issue. Sign up to receive an email with the top stories from Guardian Australia every morning Continue reading...
12/06/2021 - 01:00
Artist Steuart Padwick says the child’s arms reach across Glasgow with a simple, positive message A new public sculpture that calls for optimism about humanity’s response to the climate crisis has been installed in a park once home to Glasgow’s last working coalmine. The Hope Sculpture, featuring an androgynous child placed more than 20 metres high, has been erected on the bank of the Clyde as a permanent reminder of Glasgow’s role as host of the Cop26 climate summit in November. Continue reading...
12/05/2021 - 23:28
Researchers say Beijing used cloud-seeding to create artificial rain and lower pollution in July, in latest example of ‘blueskying’ efforts Chinese weather authorities successfully controlled the weather ahead of a major political celebration earlier this year, according to a Beijing university study. On 1 July the Chinese Communist party marked its centenary with major celebrations including tens of thousands of people at a ceremony in Tiananmen Square, and a research paper from Tsinghua University has said an extensive cloud-seeding operation in the hours prior ensured clear skies and low air pollution. Continue reading...
12/05/2021 - 21:13
Decision to reject Dendrobium plans has been reversed despite potential damage to drinking water Follow our live blog for the latest updates Get our free news app; get our morning email briefing The New South Wales government has been accused of being “captured” by the coal industry after it overturned a planning commission decision to block a mine expansion that it found could cause irreversible damage to drinking water and release significant heat-trapping gas. The deputy premier, Paul Toole, and planning minister, Rob Stokes, declared on Saturday the Dendrobium mine expansion near Wollongong – proposed by BHP spin-off South32 – was “state significant infrastructure” due to its role providing coal for the Port Kembla steelworks. Continue reading...
12/05/2021 - 16:14
Annastacia Palaszczuk brings forward Qld border reopening; Steven Marshall ‘very concerned’ by Omicron as SA records four Covid cases; Perth stripped of Ashes series finale; Victoria records 1,073 new cases and six deaths, NSW records 208 cases, ACT six; Katherine lockdown extended as NT records one case; Australia could be renewables ‘superpower’ but has wasted time, Chris Bowen says. This blog is now closed Queensland to reopen border early as state nears 80% double vaccination Queensland border reopening: entry requirements explained as Covid restrictions lift Scott Morrison backs Gladys Berejiklian to run for federal seat of Warringah despite Icac cloud Plug pulled on Perth Test as contenders jostle to take Ashes series finale Get our free news app; get our morning email briefing A New South Wales government plan to control feral horses in Kosciuszko national park will allow horses to remain in the only known habitat of one of Australia’s most imperilled freshwater fishes and risks pushing the species closer to extinction. Conservationists say allowing horses to continue to roam around some sections of the park will put vulnerable wildlife and ecosystems at risk. There are lot of reasons even though they don’t get as sick as adults, they have a pretty strong role in spreading it back to family members and of course that can include parents and also, of greater concern, the grandparents. The older you are, the impacts of getting seriously ill or worse with Covid is greater. The other reason is just so kids can do what kids are meant to do – go to school, play with their friends, do sport, do exercise, do social things. Continue reading...
12/05/2021 - 03:30
Our planet’s geology shaped life on Earth. But now scientists reveal it worked the other way around too The mighty forces that created our planet’s mountains in ancient days got some unexpected help, scientists have discovered. Their research shows some of Earth’s greatest ranges got a boost from primitive lifeforms whose remains lubricated movements of rock slabs and allowed them to pile up to form mountains. If it had not been for life on Earth, the surface of our planet would have been flatter and a lot more boring, say scientists at Aberdeen and Glasgow universities where the research was carried out. Continue reading...