Breaking Waves: Ocean News

01/20/2022 - 02:00
Exclusive: Officers say cuts and operational decisions have made England’s regulator ‘toothless’ Staff at England’s Environment Agency say it has been cut back to such an extent that they cannot do their jobs and the regulator is no longer a deterrent to polluters. Three officers at the EA have described to the Guardian and Ends Report how they are increasingly unable to hold polluters to account or improve the environment as a result of the body’s policies. Continue reading...
01/20/2022 - 01:00
Government says gene editing can develop climate crisis resistant crops while critics fear it is another step towards GM Research into the gene editing of plants in the UK will become much easier with new rules brought forward by the government that will encourage field trials and other development efforts. Ministers said cutting red tape on gene editing research would help to develop new strains of crops that need less pesticide, have less environmental impact and provide better nutrition. The new rules, introduced in the form of a statutory instrument laid in parliament on Thursday, will apply only to research, rather than allowing gene-edited crops into widespread cultivation or consumption. Continue reading...
01/19/2022 - 23:51
There’s still much to learn about these ‘strange alien creatures’, but climate change likely to create ideal breeding conditions, expert says Follow our Australia news live blog for the latest updates Get the free Guardian app; get our morning email briefing Armadas of alien-like sea creatures have been washing up on Australian beaches thanks to the warm weather but experts warn people should look but not touch. Jellyfish expert Dr Lisa-ann Gershwin said bluebottles had been washing up on beaches across New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia and Tasmania in “gobsmacking numbers” over the last few months thanks to the warmer weather. Sign up to receive an email with the top stories from Guardian Australia every morning Continue reading...
01/19/2022 - 16:06
Ocean Leadership ~ I hope that everyone’s 2022 is off to a great start! Each January, I like to take time to reflect on the last year and to look forward to the future with a renewed energy and outlook on life. As has become all too common, however, I can’t quite move forward from 2021 just yet—not while Congress is four months late in finishing their fiscal year (FY) 2022 spending bills. Now, instead of looking ahead and focusing on FY 2023 spending levels, including advancing the administration’s multi-agency research and development priorities—with hopefully an additional focus on the ocean—staff on and around the Hill and in the administration are stretched thin working on both. In fact, the current stopgap spending measure for FY 2022 lasts through February 18, which is 11 days after the administration’s budget request for FY 2023 is due to Congress. Already, it appears that request will be delayed until March, perhaps longer depending on when FY 2022 appropriations are finalized and by action on the remaining infrastructure bill, the Build Back Better Act. As I’ve written about before, and as a House subcommittee heard last week, the continued use of these stopgap spending measures, or even a year-long continuing resolution, has serious consequences. Over the coming weeks, I will continue to advocate for the need to grow our federal ocean science funding and hope Congress will do what’s necessary to keep us moving forward—pass FY 2022 spending bills. Member Highlight: Coastal Ecosystem Being Destabilized By Climate Change, Oregon State Research Shows Ecological communities on the Oregon coast are being subtly destabilized by the pressures of climate change despite giving an appearance of stress resistance, new research by Oregon State University shows. The findings are important because assessing and understanding how plants, animals and other life forms respond to a warming planet is critical to human welfare, lead author Bruce Menge said. The study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that ecological communities in Oregon’s rocky intertidal zone have grown less stable for at least a decade though their structure – the organisms that comprise them – has basically stayed the same. Read our most recent and past newsletters here: http://oceanleadership.org/newsletter-archive/ The post Alan Leonardi – From the President’s Office: New Year, New Spending Levels? (01-17-2022) appeared on Consortium for Ocean Leadership.
01/19/2022 - 15:30
Endangered coho salmon spotted returning to spawning grounds after well-timed precipitation The heavy rains that soaked California late last year were welcomed by farmers, urban planners – and endangered coho salmon. “We’ve seen fish in places that they haven’t been for almost 25 years,” said Preston Brown, the director of watershed conservation for the Salmon Protection and Watershed Network (Spawn). Continue reading...
01/19/2022 - 13:50
The release of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas responsible for almost a quarter of global warming, is being studied around the world, from Arctic wetlands to livestock feedlots. A team has discovered a source much closer to home: 349 plumes of methane gas bubbling up from the seafloor in Puget Sound, which holds more water than any other U.S. estuary.
01/19/2022 - 12:50
Northumbrian Water admitted two breaches of law after manhole collapse led to sewer blockage A water company has been fined £240,000 after a damaged manhole led to two unauthorised sewage discharges into a stream. Untreated sewage leaked into Coundon Burn in Bishop Auckland, County Durham, on 13 March 2017. A member of the public rang Northumbrian Water after seeing effluent in the stream, and the firm – which had a turnover of £834.6m that year – sent workers to free a sewer blockage. Continue reading...
01/19/2022 - 12:14
Direct observations were made on the interactions between aerosol particles formed in boreal forests and clouds in the atmospheric boundary layer.
01/19/2022 - 06:00
Tightening regulations and a growing eco-conscious workforce are major factors in heralding green office campuses About 40 miles south of San Francisco, three futuristic structures rise from the earth. With sloping roofs clad in thousands of overlapping tiles, the buildings could be mistaken for the world’s most architecturally advanced circus tent. They are, in fact, part of Google’s new Bay View campus, which is due to welcome employees this year – pandemic allowing – and is situated a few miles east of its existing HQ campus in Mountain View. Continue reading...
01/19/2022 - 06:00
Customers saddled with paying 600 times the usual price for energy as regulators are accused of being too close to the industry they monitor When Neil Crittenden heard that an extreme winter storm was about to hit Oklahoma last winter, he did what officials advised him to do and kept his heat on and water running so that his pipes wouldn’t freeze. The 40-year-old Oklahoma City resident even used hair dryers to keep them thawed. What Crittenden didn’t know at the time was that the energy he used was going to cost him significantly. As winter storm Uri swept across the south central US last February, utilities that weren’t prepared scrambled. The storm caused blackouts in several states and resulted in the deaths of at least 223 people. Continue reading...