Breaking Waves: Ocean News

06/11/2021 - 11:07
Opec and allies will face pressure to pump more fossil fuels as economies recover, says IEA The world’s demand for oil will rebound to pre-pandemic levels by the end of 2022, as recovering economies require oil-producing countries to pump more fossil fuels, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA). Members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (Opec) and their allies, including Russia, collectively known as Opec+, will need to “open the taps to keep the world oil markets adequately supplied”, the global energy watchdog said in its monthly oil report. Continue reading...
06/11/2021 - 07:53
Poll on eve of conference shows support for party has fallen away after fuel price debate The leaders of Germany’s Greens will resist a push by party activists this weekend to adopt more ambitious climate policies, balancing their ecologist message with care to ensure poorer voters are not left out of pocket after September’s election. The Greens, aiming to win the chancellery for the first time at the 26 September federal election, surged ahead of Angela Merkel’s Christian Democrats (CDU) in polls in late April after picking Annalena Baerbock as their candidate to run for chancellor. Continue reading...
06/11/2021 - 06:55
Ship cannot sail out of Egyptian waters as authorities detain crew and cargo until owners pay for blockages Lemons, bamboo shoots and tofu sit in the sweltering heat, alongside goods from Lenovo, Ikea, Dixons Carphone and dozens of other brands – including barbecues, sun loungers, swimwear, lawnmowers and camping equipment – that will arrive at their intended destinations long after summer ends. Since the successful operation in late March to dislodge the 220,000-ton Ever Given from the Suez canal, where it was stuck for six days, the cargo ship has been grounded again – this time by a fierce legal battle between the ship’s owners, insurance companies, and the Suez Canal Authority (SCA). Continue reading...
06/11/2021 - 05:00
Low water levels and high temperatures mean juvenile Chinook salmon are being given a helping hand to reach the ocean Baby Chinook salmon from California’s Central Valley typically have a long swim downriver to the ocean to survive into the next stage of life. This year, they are getting a helping hand in the form of a fleet of tanker trucks set to carry almost 17 million of the fish to the sea. It’s all part of a flurry of steps across western US states to keep tens of millions of endangered salmon from suffering in a year of historic drought for the region. Continue reading...
06/11/2021 - 05:00
For two weeks in late spring, near dusk, the fireflies at the most-visited national park in the US flash in unison, a ‘one-of-a-kind natural phenomenon’ As fireflies in the southern Appalachians search for their mates each year, a crowd of people awaits them, hoping to catch a glimpse of a rare light show known to some as a life-changing experience. For two weeks in late spring, near dusk, the synchronous fireflies at the Great Smoky Mountains national park put on a spectacular display across the landscape, flashing in unison for about five seconds and then stopping, together, like twinkling Christmas lights. Continue reading...
06/11/2021 - 04:30
Welcome to our monthly roundup of the biggest issues in farming and food production, with must-read reports from around the web MEPs have voted in favour of a resolution calling for a ban on the use of cages across the EU for farmed animals by 2027. They also called on the EU Commission to ban the force-feeding of ducks and geese for the production of foie gras. Campaigners estimate that more than 300 million animals in the EU spend all or part of their lives in cages, pens or stalls.JBS, the world’s biggest meat producer, has paid an $11m (£7.8m) ransom after a cyber-attack shut down operations, including abattoirs in the US, Australia and Canada. The ransomware attack disrupted production at beef and lamb processing plants and sent meat prices rising. JBS, which supplies more than a fifth of all beef in the US, said all of its American beef plants had been forced offline. Continue reading...
06/11/2021 - 04:00
We must find a way to embrace shipping, the ocean and our place in the world without shackling ourselves to unpayable foreign debt Growing up in Sri Lanka in the 1990s, it was drilled into me from an early age that my island was destined to be a maritime hub. At school, I was taught that Sri Lanka was once the heart of the maritime Silk Road, a network of trade routes that connected the east and west from 130BC to the mid-1400s. My textbooks were filled with tales about how Sri Lanka’s strategic positioning and rich natural resources were so prized that it was consecutively colonised by the Portuguese, Dutch and British empires for almost four centuries. Continue reading...
06/11/2021 - 02:00
With Swytch, you can clamp a wheel, battery and sensor to any model and enjoy a power-assisted ride I’ve been something of a sceptic about technological bike gizmos over the years, add-ons that too often seem to represent a solution in search of a problem, an attempt to reinvent something – the bicycle – that was not far short of perfect anyway. I’m no luddite. New developments make cycling even more enjoyable and useful, not least near-puncture proof tyres and tiny, retina-searing lights. Plus, of course, there’s the amazing world of electric-assist bikes, or e-bikes. Continue reading...
06/11/2021 - 01:00
Fast-fashion boom fuelling rise in use of synthetic fibres made from fossil fuels, study shows Approximately half of the clothes sold by large online fashion brands such as Boohoo and Asos are made entirely from virgin plastic materials such as polyester, despite a push to reduce the huge environmental impact of the fashion industry. An analysis of 10,000 items added to the Asos, Boohoo, Missguided and PrettyLittleThing websites over a fortnight in May found an average of 49% were made entirely of new plastics such as polyester, acrylic and nylon. In some stores just 1% contained recycled fabric, according to the Royal Society for Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (RSA) study. Continue reading...
Main Street Bucksport Partners with W2O for International Maritime Film Festival
04/30/2019 - 13:16
Bucksport, Maine, USA | April 2019 Main Street Bucksport is pleased to announce a newly formed partnership with World Ocean Observatory to produce the International Maritime Film Festival. They join media partner WoodenBoat Publications and community partner Island Institute. Since 2003 World Ocean Observatory has been a major utility for ocean communication as a means to advance public awareness and political will, and is dedicated to providing information and education about the health of the ocean. Online at worldoceanobservatory.org. The International Maritime Film Festival (IMFF) is now in its 4th year and is an annual juried contest of films celebrating the heritage, spirit of adventure, and ingenuity of boats and waterborne pursuits. It is the premier event for maritime-themed film making. This year’s festival takes place at the historic Alamo Theatre in downtown Bucksport from September 27-September 29, 2019. A program will be announced and tickets will go on sale in July 2019. IMFF accepts films on a broad range of maritime subjects. These include, but are not limited to, voyaging, racing, working, leisure, boatbuilding and restoration, historical documentary, and environment and science. Judging is not category-specific; rather, all films will be evaluated in relation to each other, in one of two tracks: Feature Length (40 minutes or more), or Shorts (under 40 minutes). All films are to be in English, or to carry English subtitles. A Grand Prize of $1,000 will be awarded in the Feature Length category and the Runner Up will receive $500. A Grand Prize of $500 will be awarded to winning Short Film and the Runner Up will receive $250. Submissions may be made online at maritimefilmfestival.com.
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