Breaking Waves: Ocean News

01/25/2022 - 00:01
$9tn of annual investment required to avoid most catastrophic climate impacts, consultancy says Reaching net zero climate emissions by 2050 will require a “fundamental transformation of the global economy”, according to a report by McKinsey, one of the world’s most influential consulting firms. It estimates that $9.2tn will need to be invested every year for decades to limit the global temperature rise to 1.5C and end the climate emergency. The sum is a 40% increase on current investment levels and equivalent to half of global corporate profits. Continue reading...
01/24/2022 - 20:38
Cycling festival begins as campaigners push to end sponsorship deal and oil company boss says there’s ‘no alternative’ to fossil fuels Get our free news app; get our morning email briefing Follow our Australia news live blog for the latest updates Campaigners are calling for the Tour Down Under to follow the example of Tennis Australia and abandon its sponsorship deal with Santos as the oil company’s boss says those looking for a faster transition to renewable energy are “dreaming”. Santos CEO Kevin Gallagher has defended the oil and gas company in the face of increasing pressure over its efforts to open up new gas fields, telling the Sydney Morning Herald there is currently “no alternative” to fossil fuels. Sign up to receive an email with the top stories from Guardian Australia every morning Continue reading...
01/24/2022 - 15:01
Six years ago poachers hacked off Sehawukele’s horns; now he’s back in a game reserve A 10-year-old white rhino whose horns were brutally hacked off has returned to the wild after 30 operations over six years to repair the gash in his face. His rescuers named the bull Sehawukele, meaning “God have mercy on us”. Called Seha for short, he was found by police stumbling near a fence in a reserve, so disfigured that he could barely hear or eat. Continue reading...
01/24/2022 - 11:00
Researchers say ‘wheeze honks’ are identity signals, with reactions ranging from calls to spraying dung linked to level of familiarity A call from a stranger may elicit myriad responses – panic, confusion, maybe even excitement – but it turns out that hippos have a rather more corporeal reaction: they spray dung. Researchers studying hippopotamuses in Mozambique have revealed that the creatures not only react to the vocalisations of other hippos, but that the calls act as an identity signal. In other words, they allow hippos to tell the difference between a familiar individual and a stranger. Continue reading...
01/24/2022 - 10:08
Shoots cause stress for migratory species such as Svalbard barnacle goose, whose numbers are down 38% The RSPB has called for an emergency shooting ban after an “unprecedented” outbreak of bird flu that has left wildfowl populations in “catastrophic decline”. Migratory geese that overwinter on the Solway Firth, which stretches between Scotland and Cumbria, are being hardest hit, with a 38% decline in the Svalbard barnacle goose breeding population from winter last year. Continue reading...
01/24/2022 - 09:15
Aviva Investors says voting at AGMs will be influenced by policies on climate, human rights, biodiversity and executive pay Aviva Investors, an important UK asset manager, has put the directors of 1,500 companies on notice that it is willing to seek their removal if they fail to show enough urgency in tackling issues including the climate crisis and human rights. The firm said the way it votes on the re-election of company board members in the upcoming AGM season would be heavily influenced by its four key stewardship priorities for the year, which also include biodiversity and executive pay. Continue reading...
01/24/2022 - 07:09
TV gardener points to shipping footprint and rainforest destruction, saying he also finds the fruit ‘insipid’ The TV gardener Alan Titchmarsh has said he refuses to eat avocados for breakfast because of their “enormous carbon footprint” and much prefers Shreddies. Writing in Gardeners’ World magazine, Titchmarsh said he could not bear the idea of “forcing” down the “insipid” fruit first thing in the morning, before suggesting that he believed it should be boycotted on environmental grounds. Continue reading...
01/24/2022 - 06:34
Activists say bill being presented to parliament sanctions irreversible destruction of environment A nationwide day of action against HS2 – involving banner drops, solidarity protests and a “Twitter storm” – is planned for Monday as the bill to expand the line beyond Crewe is presented to parliament. Environmental activists say the bill will “sanction immense and irreversible destruction to the environment” and want to raise awareness of HS2’s “continuing ecocide, corruption and financial mismanagement”. Continue reading...
01/24/2022 - 05:52
If overlooked open spaces were used, dependence on overseas imports could be reduced, research finds Britain could grow up to eight times its current production of fruit and vegetables if all available urban and under-used green space were turned to cultivation, new research has shown. Only about 1% of urban green space is made up of allotments, but if gardens were used, along with parks, playing fields, watersides and other overlooked open spaces, the area would add up to enough to grow nearly 40% of the UK’s fresh fruit and vegetable consumption, most of which comes from overseas, according to the study. Continue reading...
01/24/2022 - 02:45
One-horned species was nearly extinct before poaching was curbed. Now the climate crisis could pose a greater threat Ganesh Pant worries about the future. While he delights in the stunning conservation accomplishment that has seen the numbers of greater one-horned rhinos in Nepal jump from 100 in 1965 to 752 in 2021, he wants to be sure that success will continue. Before the 1950s, as many as 1,000 rhinos roamed the grasslands and forests of Nepal. But by 1965, rampant hunting, poaching and changes in land use had brought the species close to extinction in the country. Then, the national park was established in 1973 and thanks to concerted conservation efforts, the rhino population began to bounce back. Continue reading...