Breaking Waves: Ocean News

10/05/2022 - 03:26
Andrew Liveris says his position at Saudi Aramco means he ‘knows the solutions’ as he presides over climate-positive games Get our free news app, morning email briefing or daily news podcast Andrew Liveris has defended sitting on the board of the most polluting company in history at the same time as presiding over the organisation of an Olympic Games being billed as “climate positive”, saying: “If you emit, you actually know the solutions.” Liveris is on the board of directors of the world’s biggest oil company, Saudi Aramco, which is 95% owned by the Saudi Arabian government. Sign up to receive an email with the top stories from Guardian Australia every morning Continue reading...
10/05/2022 - 00:00
Out of 44 charities, only 4% said they had a consistently implemented action plan to increase ethnic diversity The environment sector has failed to act on its ambitions to become more inclusive, suggests new research that finds just one in 20 organisations are enacting plans to increase ethnic diversity. According to a sector-wide survey, out of 44 environment charities, 84% had considered or were taking action over a lack of inclusion, but only 4% said they had a consistently implemented action plan. Continue reading...
10/05/2022 - 00:00
Chiriquí harlequin frogs went extinct in 1996 due to a fungal disease that has driven the decline of 501 amphibian species It was a remarkably elaborate mating ritual. When a male Chiriquí harlequin frog found its mate, it would climb on to the female’s back, grip its armpits with its forelimbs and hug it. Females of the species were often twice as large as the males, and they would remain in this mating clasp for days or even months – depending on when the female was ready to lay her eggs. During this time, the male might forgo eating and lose up to 30% of its body weight, but it was willing to wait. It has been almost 30 years since a scientist last witnessed this act. In 2019, with little fanfare, the species was declared extinct. Continue reading...
10/04/2022 - 23:01
PFAS, now found in nearly all umbilical cord blood around the world, interfere with hormones crucial to testicle development A new peer-reviewed Danish study finds that a mother’s exposure to toxic PFAS “forever chemicals” during early pregnancy can lead to lower sperm count and quality later in her child’s life. PFAS – per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances – are known to disrupt hormones and fetal development, and future “reproductive capacity” is largely defined as testicles develop in utero during the first trimester of a pregnancy, said study co-author Sandra Søgaard Tøttenborg of the Copenhagen University Hospital. Continue reading...
10/04/2022 - 20:27
Government deems controversial project critical state infrastructure in order to have it approved ‘as quickly as possible’ Follow our Australia news live blog for the latest updates Get our free news app, morning email briefing or daily news podcast The New South Wales premier, Dominic Perrottet, has declared he will put “people before plants” as he announced the Warragamba Dam will be raised 14 metres, despite the project not having environmental approval or funding. Speaking at the western Sydney catchment on Wednesday, Perrottet announced the dam wall raising had been declared a critical state significant infrastructure project, handing final state approval to the planning minister, Anthony Roberts. Sign up to receive an email with the top stories from Guardian Australia every morning Continue reading...
10/04/2022 - 20:00
On the October Episode of the WaterLog Podcast, Howard and Dan follow the destructive wake of Hurricane Ian across the Gulf and East Coasts and discuss the Corps’ role in assessing and repairing damages from hurricanes and coastal storms. Then, a discussion on federal flood insurance and an update on congressional appropriations and supplemental disaster funding for the Corps and other federal agencies. WaterLog apologizes for the quality of audio in this episode, we are on the road following Ian!
10/04/2022 - 18:00
‘Bizarre’ weather patterns are deterring farmers from planting crops and forcing others to sell livestock earlier than usual, says NSW grazier Sign up for the Rural Network email newsletter Join the Rural Network group on Facebook to be part of the community Farmers across eastern Australia are preparing for the possibility of a “wet drought” and major crop losses as parts of New South Wales and southern Queensland brace for more wet weather and flash flooding. “A wet drought is the same as a drought, you don’t get any crop because of weather reasons. But unfortunately, it’s because everything’s got too wet. So basically, the crops get washed out,” the Grain Growers Limited chairman, Brett Hosking, said. Sign up to receive Guardian Australia’s fortnightly Rural Network email newsletter Continue reading...
10/04/2022 - 11:46
Few in Somerset MP’s constituency share his enthusiasm but some do agree with need for ‘unpopular measures’ The sun was shining and the wind blowing steadily across Jacob Rees-Mogg’s manicured garden and the Somerset hills beyond. “It’s obvious on a day like this, isn’t it?” said Gary Marsh, a stonemason and a neighbour of the business secretary and Conservative MP for North East Somerset. “We should be putting more money into solar and wind energy. Plus tidal power on the coast at places like Burnham-on-Sea and Weston-super-Mare. Not fracking, messing with the earth and water.” Continue reading...
10/04/2022 - 11:30
Australian Conservation Foundation report finds modular reactors are expensive and introduce unnecessary challenges in managing radioactive waste Follow our Australia news live blog for the latest updates Get our free news app, morning email briefing or daily news podcast The next generation of small nuclear reactors being advocated by the Coalition would raise electricity prices, slow the uptake of renewables and introduce new risks from nuclear waste, according to a report from the Australian Conservation Foundation. But the report from the conservation group has found only two small modular reactors (SMRs) are known to be operating around the world, in Russia and China, and both have seen large cost blowouts. Sign up to receive an email with the top stories from Guardian Australia every morning Continue reading...
10/04/2022 - 11:30
Report commissioned by Wave Swell Energy says the machines would make a future clean electricity grid more stable and more reliable Follow today’s news, live Get our free news app, morning email briefing or daily news podcast Deploying wave energy machines at a handful of locations on Australia’s south coast would make a future clean electricity grid more stable, more reliable and would dramatically cut the costs of buying batteries to store renewable energy, according to a new CSIRO report. The report was commissioned by Wave Swell Energy, an Australian company that has just finished a 12-month trial of its pilot plant on a beach at King Island, north of Tasmania. Continue reading...