Breaking Waves: Ocean News

05/26/2022 - 09:00
Charlie Burrell and Isabella Tree were pioneers of rewilding in the UK. Now they are setting their sights on regenerative agriculture, which will supply food to a new farm shop and cafe It’s odd to hear the owners of the UK’s pioneering rewilding project at Knepp estate in West Sussex gushing about farming. But Charlie Burrell and Isabella Tree are returning to a sector they left 20 years ago. In 2000, they let their unprofitable dairy and arable farm go to seed. Now Knepp Wildland is a 1,400 hectare (3,500 acre) rewilding project, home to a smörgåsbord of remarkable wildlife, including critically endangered nightingales and turtle doves. It is a success story that has inspired many to think differently about land, and how much wildlife we should expect in our countryside. Now, another chapter is being added to the Knepp story, as the last 150 hectares of land is amalgamated into the project. For decades, land scattered around the villages of Shipley and Dial Post was run by a tenant farmer who used it for grazing sheep. But the farmer has left and it is being scruffed up and transformed into the Knepp estate regenerative farm, which will supply local food to a new farm shop and cafe, due to open later this year. They are also opening a market garden, which will make use of manure from the cows. Knepp visitors will be able to go on farm safaris, just like they do on the rewilding project. Continue reading...
05/26/2022 - 08:17
Ocean Leadership ~ About the Role WWF’s half-century of conservation success is rooted firmly in science; it informs and underpins everything we do. WWF is applying the best available natural and social science to strategies across sectors to ensure the information required to enable a just transition to a more resilient, equitable and sustainable planet can stick. The pace and scale of this transition will dictate success or failure for nature, climate change, and sustainable development. Success requires a team with intellectual depth that energetically embraces the opportunity and risks to innovate, attempt, and adapt sustainability solutions with efficiency at the intersection of science and practice. The Global Oceans Lead Scientist (Lead Scientist) provides the scientific leadership for WWF’s Oceans Practice. The Lead Scientist is an important partner to the Chief Scientist and the Oceans Practice across our WWF Network, providing thought leadership, scientific analysis in support of goal and strategy development, and the management of internal and external science talent to support the Global Oceans team in advancing WWF’s ambitious agenda. The Lead Scientist will serve as a member of the WWF Global Science Leadership Team, providing expertise and support for interdisciplinary analyses to advance cross-functional strategies. This is an opportunity for a dynamic, strategic thinker who is passionate about conservation and has demonstrated success in leading rigorous scientific research with partners to support issues related to ocean conservation. Responsibilities Position responsibilities include: Works with leadership and colleagues to ensure that goals, strategies, and assessments of impact are grounded in, and informed by, the best available natural and social science, providing scientific and policy-relevant expertise and promoting innovative research and synthesis of research Conducts and supports colleagues in conducting research in a conservation-relevant science discipline, publishes in high-profile journals for impact, stays abreast of the scientific literature, and shares important findings with team staff Reviews, synthesizes, and disseminates the most relevant scientific knowledge across the WWF network and externally, and in coordination with knowledge management leads Works with the Director of Conservation Evidence to develop monitoring and evaluation frameworks for WWF’s Ocean conservation strategies Builds and maintains an extensive network of science professionals and partnerships – with key conservation NGOs, government agencies, academics, and other groups – for the purposes of research, science collaboration, and strategy development Travels internationally on a frequent basis to represent WWF at high-level meetings, workshops, conferences, and for the purposes of site visits and/or field-based research Represents WWF to promote conservation goals, activities, and thought leadership in conservation Leads and supports science and fundraising efforts, in collaboration with science and practice staff, to support the WWF Network’s Oceans Practice Manages, coordinates, and supports science staff and external collaborators for implementation of priorities Other duties as assigned Qualifications The successful candidate will demonstrate the following: 12+ years with an advanced degree in a natural or social science discipline in a conservation-relevant field with a strong emphasis on ocean conservation and management, including but not limited to area-based protection and management or rights-based management Ability to effectively prioritize and produce high-quality work under time constraints Excellent organizational and project leadership skills Proven ability to work independently as well as collaboratively in a matrixed team environment Excellent interpersonal skills requiring knowing when to use courtesy, tact and/or diplomacy to effectively communicate with all constituents Ability to operate with independence, under pressure, to meet deadlines and commitments Ability to lead by persuasion, build consensus, and think creatively Ability to demonstrate integrity in deliverables, behavior, and demeanor Ability to show respect for the organization, the work, the team, and self Have the courage to make the hard decisions which will benefit the organization, team, and work Committed to building and strengthening a culture of inclusion within and across teams Identifies and aligns with WWF’s core values: Courage, Integrity, Respect, and Collaboration Demonstrates courage by speaking up even when it is difficult, or unpopular. Builds trust with colleagues by acting with integrity, owning mistakes, and holding oneself accountable. Welcomes other points of view and ideas, recognizing and embracing different and contrary perspectives with kindness, curiosity, and encouragement. Makes conscious efforts to promote cooperative practices, behaviors, and ways of working across many groups and individuals. Compensation and Location WWF offers an excellent benefits package and a competitive salary commensurate with experience. The position location is negotiable. To Apply CEA Recruiting is assisting WWF with this search. To be considered for this position, interested candidates should click the link below to submit a resume, cover letter, and salary requirements through CEA’s job portal. https://job.ceaconsulting.com/jobs/global-oceans-lead-scientist-remote–106601 This position will remain open until filled, but we strongly encourage interested candidates to apply by June 23, 2022. Please direct all inquiries to Tamara Evans, Senior Search Lead (tamara@ceaconsulting.com). As an EOE/AA employer, WWF will not discriminate in its employment practices due to an applicant’s race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, genetic information, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, disability, or protected Veteran status. WWF values diversity and inclusion and welcomes diverse candidates to apply. CEA Recruiting works with leading environmental nonprofits, foundations, and businesses to recruit top talent and design effective organizational staffing strategies. .fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-0{width:100% !important;margin-top : 0px;margin-bottom : 0px;}.fusion-builder-column-0 > .fusion-column-wrapper {padding-top : 0px !important;padding-right : 0px !important;margin-right : 1.92%;padding-bottom : 0px !important;padding-left : 0px !important;margin-left : 1.92%;}@media only screen and (max-width:1024px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-0{width:100% !important;}.fusion-builder-column-0 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 1.92%;margin-left : 1.92%;}}@media only screen and (max-width:640px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-0{width:100% !important;}.fusion-builder-column-0 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 1.92%;margin-left : 1.92%;}}.fusion-body .fusion-flex-container.fusion-builder-row-1{ padding-top : 0px;margin-top : 0px;padding-right : 0px;padding-bottom : 0px;margin-bottom : 0px;padding-left : 0px;} The post Global Oceans Lead Scientist, WWF (June 23) appeared on Consortium for Ocean Leadership.
05/26/2022 - 04:47
Exclusive: Fears over regulator’s ability to cope with planned expansion in nuclear energy The number of formal reports documenting security issues at the UK’s civil nuclear facilities has hit its highest level in at least 12 years amid a decline in inspections, the Guardian can reveal. Experts said the news raised concerns about the regulator’s capacity to cope with planned expansion in the sector. Continue reading...
Main Street Bucksport Partners with W2O for International Maritime Film Festival
04/30/2019 - 13:16
Bucksport, Maine, USA | April 2019 Main Street Bucksport is pleased to announce a newly formed partnership with World Ocean Observatory to produce the International Maritime Film Festival. They join media partner WoodenBoat Publications and community partner Island Institute. Since 2003 World Ocean Observatory has been a major utility for ocean communication as a means to advance public awareness and political will, and is dedicated to providing information and education about the health of the ocean. Online at worldoceanobservatory.org. The International Maritime Film Festival (IMFF) is now in its 4th year and is an annual juried contest of films celebrating the heritage, spirit of adventure, and ingenuity of boats and waterborne pursuits. It is the premier event for maritime-themed film making. This year’s festival takes place at the historic Alamo Theatre in downtown Bucksport from September 27-September 29, 2019. A program will be announced and tickets will go on sale in July 2019. IMFF accepts films on a broad range of maritime subjects. These include, but are not limited to, voyaging, racing, working, leisure, boatbuilding and restoration, historical documentary, and environment and science. Judging is not category-specific; rather, all films will be evaluated in relation to each other, in one of two tracks: Feature Length (40 minutes or more), or Shorts (under 40 minutes). All films are to be in English, or to carry English subtitles. A Grand Prize of $1,000 will be awarded in the Feature Length category and the Runner Up will receive $500. A Grand Prize of $500 will be awarded to winning Short Film and the Runner Up will receive $250. Submissions may be made online at maritimefilmfestival.com.
Read more »
World OCean Radio Has Gone Global
08/20/2014 - 08:40
Aug. 7, 2014 | This is a big week for the World Ocean Observatory. First, it is a major milestone for World Ocean Radio: we broadcast our 300th audio episode since World Ocean Radio first aired in 2009. And second, this week we are announcing the launch of an expansion of World Ocean Radio into four additional languages. A selection of broadcasts (see www.WorldOceanObservatory.org/world-ocean-radio-global) are now available in French, Spanish, Portuguese, and Swahili, translated from our audio archive and representing an extraordinary opportunity to extend our communication efforts beyond English and into major geographical areas that have been outside our broadcast capacity. We now have the opportunity to offer our radio feature to outlets in France, Spain, Portugal, all the nations in Central and South America, and in certain regions of Africa. World Ocean Radio brings discussion of the ocean and its impact on all aspects of human survival to a global audience. Provided at no cost, this weekly service is intended to provide responsible information and advocacy toward greater understanding of the meaning of the ocean for its rapidly degrading state, the impact on our lives, and a variety of specific actions that can be taken-–both by governments and individuals-–to mitigate the problems, modify behaviors, evolve policies, implement change, broaden public awareness, and build political will. We are extremely proud of this accomplishment and are gratified by the enthusiastic and positive response we get from listeners all over the world. Learn more at http://www.WorldOceanObservatory.org/about-world-ocean-radio or by visiting http://www.WorldOceanObservatory.org/world-ocean-radio-global Connect with our July newsletter at http://eepurl.com/0p1fH. As always, thank you! ____________________________________________________ Here are five ways to help World Ocean Radio to engage a larger, global audience: 1. Share World Ocean Radio Forward each week's broadcast to everyone you think might be an ally. 2. Link to World Ocean Radio on your organizations' website. Consider how your organization might help by linking to World Ocean Radio on its web page, sharing it among fellow workers, incorporating it into the work it does, and promoting it to the population you serve. 3. Share World Ocean Radio with faculty & students If you are an educational institution, a museum, aquarium, or environmental program, share World Ocean Radio with your faculty and students, incorporate it into curriculum, use it to stimulate and focus discussions, promote it as a membership or community service, share it formally and informally as an educational tool, even use it as a marketing opportunity to recruit new audience with ocean interest to your programs. 4. Explore how these broadcasts might promote mutual goals Identify other partners or associations with which you work and explore ways in which these broadcasts might promote mutual goals and collective objectives by sharing with their constituents to demonstrate professional and collective interest. 5. Look for broadcast outlets in your area, especially if you are a Spanish-, French-, Portuguese-, or Swahili-speaking listener Find local, regional, or national networks, college, community, or environmental radio stations. Recruit them to the ocean cause, linking your organization to World Ocean Radio and growing your outreach and civic engagement. World Ocean Radio can speak loudly and widely for us all. Become its champion; commit to this simple action; make a connection; help us spread a message for the ocean that will be amplified and echoed across the sea that connects us all.
Read more »
No Refuge: Tons of Trash Cover Remote Alaskan Shores
07/02/2013 - 09:11
A great article by Carl Safina about the tsunami debris (Japan, 2011) washing up on the remotest shores of the Alaskan wilderness. http://ow.ly/mAk4E
Read more »
UN Secretary Ban Ki-moon to Launch "Oceans Compact"
08/15/2012 - 11:13
UN Secretary-General to Launch Oceans Compact at Yeosu International Conference NEW YORK, 10 August ― United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon will launch the Oceans Compact—an initiative to strengthen United Nations system-wide coherence to deliver on its oceans-related mandates--on Sunday, 12 August, in Yeosu, Republic of Korea. The new Compact, “Healthy Oceans for Prosperity—An Initiative of the Secretary-General,” aims to bring together all parts of the UN system to improve the coordination and effectiveness of the work of the UN on oceans. Mr. Ban will launch the initiative at the Yeosu International Conference to commemorate the 30th Anniversary of the Opening for Signature of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. “The world’s oceans are key to sustaining life on the planet,” the Secretary-General says in the Compact, “constituting a conduit for ninety per cent of the world trade, and for connecting people, markets and livelihoods.”  But he adds that humans have put the oceans under risk of irreversible damage by overfishing, climate change and ocean acidification, increasing pollution, unsustainable coastal area development, and unwanted impacts from resource extraction, resulting in loss of biodiversity, decreased abundance of species, damage to habitats and loss of ecological functions. The Oceans Compact aims to mobilize and enhance the UN system´s capacity to support actions by Governments, and promote the engagement of intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations, scientists, the private sector and industry to tackle challenges in protecting and restoring the health and productivity of the oceans for the benefit of present and future generations. The Compact sets out a strategic vision for the UN system on oceans, consistent with the Rio+20 outcome document, “The Future We Want,” in which countries agreed on a range of measures to be taken to protect the oceans and promote sustainable development. The Oceans Compact also supports the implementation of existing relevant instruments, in particular the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. With the goal of achieving “Healthy Oceans for Prosperity”, the Compact establishes three objectives: protecting people and improving the health of the oceans; protecting, recovering and sustaining the oceans’ environment and natural resources; and strengthening ocean knowledge and the management of oceans. In addition to providing a platform for all stakeholders to collaborate and accelerate progress toward promoting healthy oceans, the Compact will be underpinned by pragmatic short-, medium- and long-term strategies to increase coordination and cooperation at the national, regional and global levels as well as within the United Nations system. The intent is to address the cumulative impacts of sectoral activities on the marine environment, including through implementing ecosystem and precautionary approaches. In the Compact, the Secretary-General proposes the creation of an Oceans Advisory Group, composed of Executive Heads of involved UN system organizations, high-level policy-makers, scientists, leading ocean experts, private sector representatives, representatives of non-governmental organizations and civil society organizations. The Advisory Group would also advise on strategies for mobilizing resources needed for the implementation of the Oceans Compact Action Plan. Background The launch of the Oceans Compact follows the announcement by the Secretary-General earlier this year of his Five-Year Action Agenda, which includes oceans as a main category. In that context, he decided to give strong emphasis to the importance of oceans and their role in sustainable development by putting forward the idea of an Oceans Compact that would commit the wide United Nations System to furthering “healthy oceans for prosperity.” The timing of this initiative is especially significant as 2012 marks the 30th anniversary of the opening for signature of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, which sets out the legal framework within which all activities in the oceans and seas must be carried out.  The Convention is considered of strategic importance as the basis for national, regional and global action and cooperation in the marine sector and as an important contribution to the maintenance of peace, justice and progress for all peoples of the world.   The Division for Ocean Affairs and the Law of the Sea (DOALOS) in the United Nations Office of Legal Affairs (OLA) has been organizing a series of events at UN Headquarters to commemorate the thirtieth anniversary of the Convention, including a panel discussion held on World Oceans Day (8 June 2012 - see: www.un.org/Depts/los/reference_files/worldoceansday.htm) and the production of a video entitled "UNCLOS at 30" (available at www.un.org/Depts/los/index.htm). The commemoration will continue at the General Assembly’s sixty-seventh session, with two days of high-level meetings, on 10 and 11 December 2012, and the publication of a pamphlet and a commemorative booklet on UNCLOS. For further information, please contact Dan Shepard, UN Department of Public Information, 1 212-963-9495, email shepard@un.org  
Read more »
"Bloody Bay Wall" World Premiere
03/19/2012 - 19:03
Our friend and colleague David Conover of Compass Light Productions will debut two short films at this year's Environmental Film Festival in Washington A discussion with filmmaker David Conover and marine scientist Nancy Knowlton will follow the screening on Sunday, March 25th. "Exploring Bloody Bay Wall" was co-produced by World Ocean Observatory for inclusion in our second module, Ocean Biodiversity, for the Subscription Services.
Read more »
Summary of Oceans Day | COP17, Durban South Africa
12/05/2011 - 08:36
December 5, 2011   During the Dec. 3rd meeting a variety of issues were discussed: impacts of sea level rise, extreme weather events, the specific vulnerability of small island developing states, and ocean acidification. This REPORT chronologically summarizes the presentations and discussions held during Oceans Day at the COP17 in Durban, South Africa. A special thanks to the International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) for compiling this data into a comprehensive summary of the day.
Read more »
Peter Neill on NY Brand Lab Radio
11/08/2011 - 18:10
NY Brand Lab Radio Tuesday, November 9, 2011 10-11 a.m. EST Looking to change the future and the world? Let's start with branding Oceans. Meet Peter Neill. He’s minding the future and affairs of the world’s Oceans. He knows every ocean needs an advocate so he’s on a mission. As Ocean Guardian, he wants the world to see the ocean as an interconnected system of relationships. The ocean, after all, is comprehensive social system that integrates human need for all things (take fresh water, food, energy, health, transport, recreation, for starters.) But in reality, the significance of the ocean is fundamentally misunderstood and critically ignored at most levels of society. The ocean is, in fact,  viewed as just a place apart. Call in to the show with a question or to join in the conversation: (646) 652-2383.
Read more »