Breaking Waves: Ocean News

05/23/2022 - 20:19
Largest single release of the endangered animals seeks to grow population that had been completely wiped out from mainland Australia Get our free news app; get our morning email briefing There are hopes 50 eastern quolls returned to the wilderness in NSW will spark a historic baby boom for the endangered creatures. It’s the largest single release of the little predators on mainland by conservation organisation Aussie Ark. Continue reading...
05/23/2022 - 15:48
Ocean Leadership ~ March 24, 2022 Dear Senators Schumer, McConnell, Cantwell, and Wicker: We, the undersigned, write to urge the inclusion of the BLUE GLOBE Act in the final text of the United States Innovation and Competition Act of 2021 (S. 1260) / America COMPETES Act of 2022 (H.R. 4521). This bipartisan legislation is already incorporated into the America COMPETES Act as passed by the House, and the Senate version of the standalone bill was reported favorably by the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation in May of 2021. Every great global superpower in history has been advanced in their naval capabilities and marine technologies. The current reality is that we know very little about our coastal and deep ocean territories. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), less than twenty percent of the global ocean is currently mapped and there remains a vast maritime world of information out there that we don’t know. More than that, the US is lagging behind other countries, including China, in their level of investment in marine research, technology and R&D workforce. The absence of critical data around our marine environments makes it difficult for Congress and federal agencies to make sound policy decisions. The BLUE GLOBE Act is a critical step in correcting this data shortage, by advancing ocean technologies and scientific research to increase our collective understanding and enact more strategic decisions, ensuring the health of our oceans and support for the Blue Economy. Sustaining healthy oceans is critical to protecting our food, economic, and national securities. Seafood is the largest traded food commodity in the world, with billions of people relying on seafood as their primary source of protein. As such, domestic commercial and recreational fisheries have a tremendous economic impact on our communities, providing millions of jobs and creating billions of dollars in revenue. More data and mapping will provide critical information necessary for fishermen. The ocean economy is an important component of the US’s growing economy. According to a 2020 report released by NOAA on the US Ocean and Great Lakes Economy, “GDP from the ocean economy grew 5.7 percent between 2014 and 2015, more than twice as fast as the U.S. economy as a whole, which grew by 2.7 percent.” Further, according to the Ocean Foundation, the value of the oceans economy sectors, which include fisheries and coastal tourism, among other sectors, is estimated to be around $3 trillion dollars every year. There are tremendous opportunities here for US investment and competition. Federal investment in the blue technology sector is key to expanding innovation and research, sustainable economic growth and to fill the large gaps in private and public financing currently available to blue technology innovators. Opportunities for economic expansion exist with increased investment including aquaculture and fisheries, marine biotechnology, maritime robotics, maritime transportation, offshore renewable energy and ocean-based climate change solutions such as coastal habitat restoration and water and wastewater management. Over the last few years, the United States Coast Guard has recognized illegal, unreported, and unregulated (IUU) fishing as the leading global maritime security threat. Around the world, IUU fishing depletes marine resources, damages ecosystems and healthy fisheries, and often relies on illicit human trafficking and forced labor. The BLUE GLOBE Act includes language that would tackle IUU fishing by amending the Maritime Security and Fisheries Enforcement Act to add innovative technologies like improved satellite imagery, advanced electronic monitoring equipment, and vessel location data. U.S. leadership has an opportunity to support the growth of the blue economy, improve understanding and management of marine resources while ensuring we stay a global competitive leader in the blue technology sector and R&D workforce. We respectfully urge you to ensure this strong piece of bipartisan legislation is included in the final language of the United States Innovation and Competition Act of 2021 (S. 1260) / America COMPETES Act of 2022 (H.R. 4521). The more we know, the better equipped we are to protect our communities, coasts, and country. Sincerely, The Association of National Estuary Programs Cape Fear Ocean Labs Consortium for Ocean Leadership FUGRO IOOS Association IOSTIA Joint Ocean Commission Initiative OPT CC: The Honorable Nancy Pelosi, Speaker of the House and the Honorable Kevin McCarthy, House Republican Leader Read full letter here. The post Letter Supporting Inclusion of the BLUE GLOBE Act in USICA appeared on Consortium for Ocean Leadership.
05/23/2022 - 15:34
Ocean Leadership ~ May 23, 2022 FR Doc. 2022-07941 Subject: Public Comment on National Science Foundation Proposal/Award Information-NSF Proposal and Award Policies and Procedures Guide   To the National Science Foundation, The Consortium for Ocean Leadership (COL), which represents our nation’s leading ocean science, research, and technology organizations from academia, industry, and the larger nonprofit sector (to include philanthropy, associations, and aquariums), appreciates the opportunity to provide input to the proposed revisions to the National Science Foundation (NSF) Proposal/Award Information-NSF Proposal and Award Policies and Procedures Guide (PAPPG). COL has been working with the ocean – and broader natural science – community to identify and promote policies and actions that address the special problems of remote research settings in harassment prevention, target support, and incident response. The Report of the Workshop to Promote Safety in Field Sciences, generated by COL and California State University Desert Studies, summarizes a range of recommendations to provide safe and inclusive field environments for people of all backgrounds and identities, including the suggestion that federal funding entities support and incentivize Principal Investigators to ensure safe and inclusive field environments by making a safety plan a mandatory, reviewed component of proposals (recommendations 2.2 and 3.1 in the report linked above). So, COL applauds NSF for the proposed revision to its Proposal and Award Policies and Procedures Guide to include the requirement, for proposals supporting field work, for a Plan for Safe and Inclusive Field/Vessel/Aircraft Research (PSI-FVAR) as described in Chapter II.C.2.i(ix). The proposed background and preparation sections of the PSI-FVAR, as outlined in the draft PAPPG, are clear and adhere to best practice recommendations. Completing this PSI-FVAR for proposal submission will ensure Principal Investigators clearly understand the unique circumstances of their proposed field environment, the field participants, and the required policies, processes, and training, for handling incidents in the field. We offer below a few suggestions to improve the PSI-FVAR requirement. First, the guidance calls for Principal Investigators to provide detail regarding the multiple organizations that will be involved in the project. These may not be specifically known at time of proposal. For example, within ocean science, projects using small fishing vessels, as opposed to vessels in the academic fleet, will require some flexibility in this regard. However, the Principal Investigator should include a strategy for how multi-institutional challenges will be handled, for example, how agreement on safety plans and processes will be reached in advance of field work and how to bring partners to the highest level of safety and inclusivity. A plan is only as good as the institution with the most lenient policies. The need for accountability could be stronger in the proposed outline. In PSI-FVAR section 2, Principal Investigators should identify those accountable for properly handling and reporting incidents in the field and for ensuring consequences for any individual found to have engaged in misconduct or unethical or disrespectful behavior per NSF’s stated expectations. Will Principal Investigators be required to report on their success or lessons learned in funded project reports? How will NSF hold Principal Investigators (and others) accountable for following the PSI-FVAR? If these field safety and inclusivity plans are to be taken seriously, it will be critical that projects demonstrate adherence to their PSI-FVAR in the first annual progress report. Finally, we would ask if each of the NSF Directorates and Divisions that fund field research have developed their review criteria for these PSI-FVAR. These will be new to reviewers, and, thus, they will need resources for evaluating that a plan has been well thought out. The above referenced report includes a pre-expedition checklist focused on safety that can serve as a guide for both Principal Investigators and reviewers in developing and evaluating the PSI-FVAR. A version of this checklist, tailored for ocean (vessel-based) science is in development, which will be peer-reviewed and published on a timeline that aligns with the effective date of the revised PAPPG. While these questions and suggestions are important and will strengthen the proposed collection of information, overall, the PSI-FVAR is an excellent step forward for NSF and the science community. We believe that the agency’s estimate of the additional paperwork’s burden is accurate, and moreover, we wish to reiterate the positive impacts that mandated safety plans will have. Thank you for the opportunity to provide input to the draft PAPPG revisions. Again, we commend the NSF on the important addition of the PSI-FVAR requirement in proposals for field research. Respectfully, Kristen Yarincik Vice President and Director, Research and Education Consortium for Ocean Leadership Read full letter here.  The post Comments on 2022 Revisions to the National Science Foundation’s Proposal and Award Policies and Procedures Guide appeared on Consortium for Ocean Leadership.
05/23/2022 - 15:33
Governor’s warning comes amid drought after driest January-March period in at least a century California could face mandatory water restrictions if residents don’t use less on their own as the drought drags on and the hotter summer months approach, the state’s governor has said. Gavin Newsom threatened the possibly of statewide mandates in a meeting with representatives from major water agencies, including those that supply Los Angeles, San Diego and the San Francisco Bay Area, according to his office. The Democratic governor has avoided issuing sweeping mandatory cuts in water use and instead favored an approach that gives local water agencies power to set rules for water use in the cities and towns they supply. Continue reading...
05/23/2022 - 14:00
Focussing on carbon dioxide alone will not keep world within 1.5C limit of global heating, warn scientists Cutting methane sharply now is crucial, as focusing on carbon dioxide alone will not be enough to keep rising temperatures within livable limits, scientists have warned. CO2 is the greenhouse gas most responsible for heating the planet, with most of it coming from the burning of fossil fuels. As a result, it has been the major focus of international efforts to prevent climate breakdown. Continue reading...
05/23/2022 - 13:00
Soaring temperatures in subcontinent, which have caused widespread suffering, would be extraordinarily rare without global heating The heatwave scorching India and Pakistan has been made 30 times more likely by the climate crisis, according to scientists. Extreme temperatures and low rainfall since mid-March have caused widespread suffering, including deaths, crop losses, forest fires, and cuts to power and water supplies. The study is the latest to show the already severe impacts of global heating on millions of people, even though the global average temperature has risen only 1.2C above pre-industrial levels to date. If it rises to 2C, heatwaves as intense as the current one would be expected as often as every five years in India and Pakistan, the scientists estimated. Continue reading...
05/23/2022 - 12:30
Guardian Australia understands Climate 200 is likely to back independents in upcoming state elections Australia federal election 2022 LIVE – latest news, updates and results Election 2022 results: live votes tracker and federal seat counts Get our free news app; get our morning email briefing The wave of “teal” independents that dislodged a swathe of “moderate” Liberal MPs in Saturday’s federal election is expected to seep into upcoming state elections in Victoria and New South Wales. Amid record-low primary votes for federal Labor and the Coalition, the incoming independent candidates ran campaigns centred on climate action, integrity and gender issues. Sign up for the fun stuff with our rundown of must-reads, pop culture and tips for the weekend, every Saturday morning Continue reading...
05/23/2022 - 12:30
Covid disruptions in China and rising costs are affecting supplies of solar panels and wind turbine parts, while domestic energy prices climb Get our free news app; get our morning email briefing Follow our Australia news live blog for the latest updates Supply chain delays from China and the soaring cost of steel and other materials are combining to slow the advance of renewable energy in Australia and elsewhere, a leading insurer and industry groups say. The cost of steel for wind turbine blades had risen by 50% or more since the Covid pandemic’s start, even before Russia’s invasion of Ukraine prompted a scramble to accelerate the switch away from coal, oil and gas to clean energy alternatives, according to GCube, a global insurer of renewables that has recently opened its first Australian office in Sydney. Continue reading...
05/23/2022 - 12:12
Annual survey is important for understanding health of the Atlantic puffin’s breeding colonies The annual Farne Islands puffin count returns – in pictures It may well be one of the least hi-tech nature counts in the UK, and involves rangers sticking their arms blindly down a hole knowing there will be one of five outcomes: they will feel either a puffin egg, a puffling, excrement, nothing at all – or the annoyed reaction of a puffin as a giant hand suddenly enters its home. “They will quite often give you a wee nip,” said Harriet Reid, an area ranger at the National Trust, smiling. “I can show you a couple of scars … it does hurt. But I’m used to it.” Continue reading...
05/23/2022 - 09:18
Ocean Leadership ~ The Gulf of Mexico Youth Climate Summit (GOMYCS) is thrilled to announce that our application for the Inaugural Gulf of Mexico Youth Advisory Congress is officially open for interested young stewards! This Youth Advisory Congress (YAC) will help to shape GOMYCS’s annual Youth Climate Summit and contribute to an international (US, Mexico, and Cuba) collaborative team focused on working with notable researchers & policy-makers to strengthen their stewardship, grow as strong environmental activists within their communities, and collaborate on concrete environmental policies, programs, and campaigns within the Gulf. Do you know of any young environmental advocates ages 15-25 that may be fitting for this historic opportunity? If so, please encourage them to Apply to the Gulf of Mexico Youth Advisory Congress! This is a one-of-a-kind opportunity to join a youth congress designated to the Gulf of Mexico. We are exclusively extending the application deadline for your interested network of young activists to June 20th, 2022 at 11:59pm Central Standard Time. Have any questions? Check out our GOM Youth Advisory Congress-Info Sheet or please feel free to message us back and we’ll make sure to respond soon. In the meantime, please share this application opportunity with your youth network and stay connected with our content @gomyouthclimate on socials. .fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-2{width:100% !important;margin-top : 0px;margin-bottom : 0px;}.fusion-builder-column-2 > .fusion-column-wrapper {padding-top : 0px !important;padding-right : 0px !important;margin-right : 1.92%;padding-bottom : 0px !important;padding-left : 0px !important;margin-left : 1.92%;}@media only screen and (max-width:1024px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-2{width:100% !important;}.fusion-builder-column-2 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 1.92%;margin-left : 1.92%;}}@media only screen and (max-width:640px) {.fusion-body .fusion-builder-column-2{width:100% !important;}.fusion-builder-column-2 > .fusion-column-wrapper {margin-right : 1.92%;margin-left : 1.92%;}}.fusion-body .fusion-flex-container.fusion-builder-row-3{ padding-top : 0px;margin-top : 0px;padding-right : 0px;padding-bottom : 0px;margin-bottom : 0px;padding-left : 0px;} The post Apply for the Gulf of Mexico Youth Advisory Congress (June 20) appeared on Consortium for Ocean Leadership.